Op-Ed01 June

Climate Politics 2010: after Copenhagen

Sergio Abranches

We should not expect too much from the first climate talks after Copenhagen, now taking place in Bonn. There are still some political obstacles to tackle before we can get any real further progress. More »

Op-Ed16 March

A present danger

Sergio Abranches

Climate-related risks and greening the supply-chain are common features of most presentations about sustainability and corporate social responsibility. Sometimes they are presented as “trends” or future threats. But they are not something that will happen in the future. They are already part of the daily affairs of most companies. And they are inseparable from each other. More »

Op-Ed10 March

Climate diplomacy: Copenhagen versus Kyoto

Now that China and India have formally adhered to the Copenhagen Accord, climate diplomacy has two different ways to go. And they’re not comparable, nor totally compatible.

Sergio Abranches More »

Op-Ed17 February

Climate Change 2010: In search of a realistic agenda

Sergio Abranches
Are we are moving backwards on climate change policy? The energy law in the US seems farther away today than at year end. IPCC seems to be at bay. Deniers seem to be having their heyday. The social movement seems to be too quiet. Support to the Copenhagen Accord has been at the best lukewarm. The countries pledges fall short of the 2oC target, they point to a 3.5oC scenario. More »

Op-Ed01 February

The Brazilian Wetland – Pantanal

The Brazilian Wetland, the Pantanal is highly endangered by unregulated and illegal economic activities that lead to logging, wildfires, land clearing, water pollution, and erosion. Here a remainder of this endangered biodiversity treasure.

Op-Ed30 January

The Copenhagen Accord lives

Sergio Abranches

While the U.S. and the European Union embraced the Copenhagen Accord with no reserves, the BASIC countries said the Accord is not legal. The only legal instrument they accept is the Kyoto Protocol. Does it really matter if they adhere and record their quantitative voluntary actions? Is this an important divide between developed and emerging powers? More »